Cannabis in Ancient Japanese Medicine

Please read Japan's Ancient Hemp History for further studies.

"What is Buddha?
Three pounds of hemp!

-Japanese Koan" (p. 26)

"During the neolithic period, a number of Asian peoples migrated from Korea to Japan, bringing with them the shamanism that was practiced in eastern Asia. In doing so, they laid the foundations of what would ultimately become Shintoism. Shamans have been a permanent fixture in Japanese society ever since that time, and they can still be found there today." (p. 27)

"In the Shinto-Honzo-Sutra (Teaching About Herbs), a pharmmacopoeia that was adopted from China at a very early date, hemp is referred to as masho. The following is noted about its effects:
This hemp heals five ailments and seven types of injuries. But if you take too much, you will go crazy. (cited in Namba 1980: 201)
In traditional Japanese medicine ( Kampo), the dried fruit of hemp (Cannabidis Semen), known variously as machinin, kaminin, or taimanin, were most frequently used.
Mashin is a medicine for the spleen, stomach, and intestines. It moistens the intestines and makes the passage smooth, so that it is used to treat constipation. Its effects are like those of sesame, but sesame is useful for nourishing the blood and for th ekidney's while mashinin is useful for moistening and smoothing the intestines. For this reason, mashinin is used to treat constipation caused by a lack of fluids resulting from stomach fever, and sesame is utilized to treat constipation due to kidney ailments and anemia....

Sha-kanzo-to

    6 g dihuang roots
    6 g ophiopogonis tubers
    3 g cinnamon bark
    3 g Chinese dates
    3 g ginseng root
    1 g ginger
    3 g hemp seeds
    3 g licorice root, roasted
    2 extract of horse leather

This Kampo medicine is prescribed for debility, heart palpitations, and shortness of breath." (pp. 28 - 29)

- excerpts taken from Kamanin: Hemp in Japanese Medicine in Marijuana Medicine: A World Tour of the Healing and Visionary Powers of Cannabis by Christian R├Ątsch (1998)

Related Reading:

Japanese Neolithic Cannabis Drawing
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